Throne Room Art Tillman Milde

Six Cursed Thrones

Got cursed thrones for your fantasy medieval tabletop role-playing games? Here’s six of ’em.

After all, who do your macho smack-talker PCs think they are anyway? Make sure they somehow find themselves in a mysterious throne room soon, and that’s when you’ll know that you’ve got ’em right where you’ll want ’em. After all, what self-respecting PC would pass up a chance to sit upon a strange throne?

In most, if not all cases, a Remove Curse spell (or reasonable facsimile thereof) will undo the curse, at the referee’s discretion.

  1. Bloodfrown’s Throne of Darkness.  Carved from blackened calcified whalebone.  If anyone other than Bloodfrown sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will henceforth emanate magical darkness in a five-kilometer radius, wherever he or she might be at the time, day or night, indoors or outdoors.  Successful saving throw versus spell reduces the radius to one kilometer.
  2. Phool’s Gold Throne.  Solid gold, ornately cast in the great smelting halls of the fire giants. If anyone besides Phool sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will henceforth always become instantly sickened at the sight of gold, in any of its forms. No saving throw. PC must also make the occasional CON check when even just being near gold, or hearing about gold, lest they become nauseated.
  3. Borzog’s Throne of Withering.  Solid oak, with platinum trim.  If anyone other than Borzog sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will henceforth begin to age at a rate of ten years per day. Successful saving throw versus spell “slows” the aging rate to one year per day.
  4. The Tinker Queen’s Clockwork Throne.  A thousand perpetually lubricated brass cogs, flywheels, gears, and springs, all encased in an airtight glass frame that’s shaped like a throne.  If anyone other than the Tinker Queen herself sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will instantly lose 1d4 percent of their current experience points. If the throne is sat upon a second time, the same thing occurs again. However, if the throne is sat upon a third time, all lost experience points are fully restored. Nothing whatsoever happens on the fourth or fifth time…but if the throne is sat upon a sixth time, the Tinker Queen teleports into the throne room and demands an explanation. No saving throw.
  5. The Ancient Gray Throne of Nairod.  Comprised of seven flat stone slabs of differing height, length, width, and angle. Opposite the room, a framed portrait appears on a wall, oil on canvas, facing the throne. Close inspection of the framed painting reveals that it appears to be an oil-on-canvas painting of an old white-bearded, well-to-do king. If anyone other than King Nairod himself sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will instantly begin to age for no apparent reason. Close inspection of the framed portrait after having sat upon the throne reveals that the framed portrait is now that of the person who had just sat upon the throne. Unless this framed portrait is covered and kept safe from harm somehow, the person who sat on the throne begins to age at the rapid rate of one year per day. Anyone sitting upon the throne after the curse has already been triggered, will then see the curse switched over to themselves, and they now see themselves in the framed portrait! No saving throw.
  6. Dunn Ktanq’s Wet Throne.  Mahogany with mother-of-pearl inlay.  If anyone other than Dunn Ktanq himself sits upon this throne, a curse is triggered! The unfortunate person who sits upon it will suddenly find themselves tumbling backwards into a pocket-dimension; a cylinder that can hold two hundred gallons of water, presently filled to ninety percent capacity. While no physical damage is incurred, the sitter still loses 1d4 hit points as a result of shame damage. The sitter may escape the cylindrical water-filled pocket-dimension filled by simply swimming up and out. The sitter, and all of his or her belongings will be completely drenched. This will continue to happen to the sitter, any time he or she sits on a chair, no matter where they might be at the time. No saving throw.

 

Note:  This featured art was created by the talented Tillman Milde, from Berlin, Germany. To learn more about this art, and how it came to be, click HERE.

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